ill - sick

ill - sick
Ill and sick are both used to say that someone has a disease or some other problem with their health.

Davis is ill.

...a sick child.

Your uncle is very sick.

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Most British speakers do not use ill in front of a noun unless they are also using an adverb. For example, they do not talk about `an ill woman', but they might talk about `a seriously ill woman'.

...a terminally ill patient.

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American and Scottish speakers sometimes use ill in front of a noun without using an adverb.

We had to get medical help for our ill sisters.

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You do not say that someone becomes `iller' or `more ill'. You say that they become worse.

Each day Kunta felt a little worse.

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'be sick'
To be sick means to bring up food from your stomach. See entry at ↑ sick.
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You do not use ill or sick to say that someone has received an injury. You say that they are injured or hurt. See entries at ↑ injure and ↑ hurt.
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Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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  • ill, sick — These terms mean of unsound physical or mental health, unhealthy, diseased, afflicted, not well. In the United States, they are used interchangeably, with ill being considered the more formal and sometimes applied only to more serious maladies… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • ill — ill, sick Ill and sick share responsibilities in peculiar ways, and are not always interchangeable. To begin with, ill is more usually predicative (placed after a verb, as in She was ill), whereas sick occurs naturally in attributive position… …   Modern English usage

  • sick — ill, sick Ill and sick share responsibilities in peculiar ways, and are not always interchangeable. To begin with, ill is more usually predicative (placed after a verb, as in She was ill), whereas sick occurs naturally in attributive position… …   Modern English usage

  • sick´en|ing|ly — sick|en|ing «SIHK uh nihng, SIHK nihng», adjective. 1. making sick; causing nausea, faintness, disgust, or loathing: »a sickening sight;…with monstrous head and sickening cry [the donkey] (G. K. Chesterton). SYNONYM(S): repulsive, offensive. 2.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • sick|en|ing — «SIHK uh nihng, SIHK nihng», adjective. 1. making sick; causing nausea, faintness, disgust, or loathing: »a sickening sight;…with monstrous head and sickening cry [the donkey] (G. K. Chesterton). SYNONYM(S): repulsive, offensive. 2. becoming… …   Useful english dictionary

  • ill — /il/, adj., worse, worst, n., adv. adj. 1. of unsound physical or mental health; unwell; sick: She felt ill, so her teacher sent her to the nurse. 2. objectionable; unsatisfactory; poor; faulty: ill manners. 3. hostile; unkindly: ill feeling. 4.… …   Universalium

  • ill — [[t]ɪl[/t]] adj. worse, worst, n. adv. 1) pat of unsound physical or mental health; unwell; sick 2) objectionable; faulty: ill manners[/ex] 3) hostile; unkindly: ill feeling[/ex] 4) evil; wicked: of ill repute[/ex] 5) unfavorable; adverse: ill… …   From formal English to slang

  • sick — [[t]sɪ̱k[/t]] ♦♦♦ sicker, sickest 1) ADJ GRADED If you are sick, you are ill. Sick usually means physically ill, but it can sometimes be used to mean mentally ill. He s very sick. He needs medication... She found herself with two small children,… …   English dictionary

  • sick-abed — adjective confined to bed (by illness) • Syn: ↑bedfast, ↑bedridden, ↑bedrid • Similar to: ↑ill, ↑sick * * * I. ˈ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ adjective …   Useful english dictionary

  • sick — See ill. See ill, sick …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

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